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BDSM – What Do You Really Know About It ?

BDSM

BDSM   stands  for bondage and discipline, dominance and submission, and sadism and masochism – is the kinky stuff you do behind closed doors but did you ever wonder where it got its start?

The history of BDSM is complicated. Combining crazy sex positions, whips and chains, pain and pleasure, and power relationships, it has been around as long as sex itself.

In Mesopotamia, the fertility goddess Inanna would whip her subjects so they would become sexually aroused. She adorned herself in jewels, riled the people up into a sex-crazed dance, and cracked her whip until they started having intercourse.

Romans had the Tomb of The Flogging (or Whipping), a room where women whipped each other in celebration of Bacchus or Dionysus, the god wine and fertility, and Juvenal mentions whips in his Satires.

Kama Sutra Contains Instructions On Passionate Slapping.

According to the Kama Sutra, there are six appropriate places to strike a person with passion and four ways to do it:

“The place of striking with passion is the body, and on the body the special places are: The shoulders, the head, the space between the breasts, the back, the jaghana, or middle part of the body, the sides…striking is of four kinds: Striking with the back of the hand, striking with the fingers a little contracted, striking with the fist, striking with the open palm of the hand.”

The lines between pain, pleasure, and passion are often intertwined given the Kama Sutra also mentions that,

“sometimes carried away by passion a woman puts aside her natural temperament and and acts the part of the man by slapping and beating him or play fighting with him…she at the height of excitation becomes hard and fearless and dominates….

We Owe The Term “Sadism” To The Marquis De Sade.

The Marquis de Sade, Donatien Alphonse François, was a French nobleman. His life and his novels were full of violent sex acts and he spent time in prison for his blasphemous, licentious behavior before being exiled from France for a time prior to the French Revolution. It was during his time in prison that he wrote one of his most famous works, Justine, a work about a woman who is subjected to numerous violent sex acts, torture, and abuse throughout her life. This kind of cruelty, the sexual fantasies and the eroticism that the Marquis de Sade put into his works, led to the term “sadism,” which is used to describe sexual arousal from pain.

The Internet Helped Bring It All Together.

As sex fetishes developed, changed, and interacted with one another, modern BDSM was born. By the late twentieth century, the BDSM subculture emerged from underground and used the Internet to meet, greet, and spank. BDSM chat-rooms, sex shops, and, later, social networking outlets, brought together like-minded people with greater ease.

 

The vocabulary of BDSM can be intimidating.

Here’s a handy glossary of some of the most common BDSM terms:

Aftercare:

Aftercare is the practice of checking in with one another after a scene (or “play session,” a.k.a., the time in which the BDSM happens) to make sure all parties feel nice and chill about what just went down. The dominant partner may bring the submissive ice for any bruises, but it’s important to know that aftercare involves emotional care as well as physical. There’s often cuddling and always conversation.

Bondage:

Bondage is the act of tying one another up. In most cases the dominant partner is restraining the submissive using ropes, handcuffs, Velcro, specialty hooks, clasps, or simply a belt.

Dominance and Submission:

Typically you’re either dominant or submissive. If you take away one fact from this guide, it should be that even though the dominant partner in D/S relationship may be slapping, name-calling, and spitting on the submissive, BDSM and D/S relationships are all about erotic power exchange, not one person having power over another. The submissive gets to set their boundaries, and everything is pre-negotiated.

Golden Showers:

At its most basic, the term “golden shower” ― also known as “urine play” or “water sports” ― is slang for a sex act involving urine. It’s the act of peeing on or around your partner(s), or getting peed on yourself!  It’s a fetish, more common in the dominant/submissive role-play scene.

Needle Play:

Also a form of edge play (blood!), needle play means using needles on a partner. It can involve sticking a needle (temporarily) through an erogenous zone such as the nipple or… the shaft of the penis.

Queening:

Queening is when a woman, a.k.a. the queen you must worship, sits on your face. It’s just a glam name for face-sitting, often used in D/S play. Sometimes the queen will sit on her submissive’s face for hours.

RACK:

RACK stands for Risk Aware Consensual Kink, which are the BDSM community guidelines on how to make sure everyone is aware of the dangers they consent to. Another set of guidelines are the “SSC,” which stresses keeping activities “safe, sane, and consensual.

Wartenberg Wheel:

A Wartenberg Wheel is a nifty little metal pinwheel that you can run over your partner’s nipples or other erogenous zones. It looks scary, but in a fun way. It can be used as part of medical play (doctor fetish) or just for the hell of it.  It’s a real-life medical device created by neurologist Robert Wartenberg to test nerve reactions.

I found a  BDSM test ..  and this are my top 10 results :

== Results from bdsmtest.org ==
98% Switch
90% Vanilla
47% Experimentalist
45% Submissive
44% Exhibitionist
31% Non-monogamist
19% Master/Mistress
15% Primal (Prey)
13% Dominant
12% Boy/Girl

Let me know what did  you get on your BDSM test. :) :)